Three successful candidates in the latest Pathway to Chartership exams discuss what chartership means to them and the path to getting there.

Leena Abraham Shah
Leena Abraham Shah

They are among the 37 who were recently successful and can now call themselves chartered landscape architects.

Leena Abraham Shah, working for the Borough of Broxbourne

I have a background in architecture, with a post-graduate qualification in landscape architecture from Germany, and have worked in Switzerland and the UK for the last nine years as a landscape architect/urban designer.

What does being chartered mean to you?

I am very happy, proud and excited to have reached this milestone in my career. Chartership gives me the recognition and credibility for my skills as a landscape architect in the industry. The Royal Charter protects the title of chartered landscape architect, and after the rigorous process that I have undergone to earn a CMLI status, and the understanding that I have gained during this time, I now feel more confident about my professional contribution at work. Also, this will provide reassurance to my clients that the standard of my professional ethics and performance is governed by the code of conduct, and their interests will be protected.

What are your thoughts on the Pathway to Chartership?

It was a very rigorous process but it was worthwhile because it provided the structure and compelled me to gain not just theoretical, but also a good working understanding of the application of the subject areas in the professional context. I have been actively on the pathway for three years and have found that the P2C provided an effective framework. Every submission required me to review the knowledge I gained during the quarter, and to plan my next steps.

The support and guidance from the P2C system, plus the advice from my mentor and supervisor, has helped me immensely, allowing me to get the best out of the process. I was encouraged to try study group meetings and I am glad that I did as I found them very effective for sharing knowledge of aspects that I haven’t had experience on.

Radek Chanas from Pegasus Environmental (part of Pegasus Group)

I graduated in 2006 from the Warsaw University of Life Science and I have been working in the UK since then. I’m mostly involved in on-shore and off-shore wind energy developments in the UK.

What does being chartered mean to you? 

For me personally, becoming a chartered member of the Landscape Institute is a recognition of my academic background and the skills I have gained throughout my professional career in the UK. I’m confident that it will  allow me to become a valuable asset to the company. It will also give a certain level of confidence to our clients that they are dealing with a chartered professional.

What are your thoughts on the Pathway to Chartership?

I found the Pathway to be the best way of linking theory with practical experience. I was lucky enough to gain a wealth of experience working on various projects both in Northern Ireland and England. The support I received from my supervisor, Paul Osborne and my mentor, Teresa Hazelwood, was enormous and they both supported me throughout my P2C experience.

Lei Wang from PRP Architects

I graduated from Greenwich University in 2007 and have been working in China, Cardiff and London.

What does being chartered mean to you? 

Acquiring this professional qualification is certainly is an important step forward in my career development. Outside the UK, chartership is seen as a proof of excellence, particularly in China and other areas where I am looking forward to practising as a landscape architect. To be frank, becoming chartered may actually be the starting point of my professional life.

What are your thoughts on the Pathway to Chartership?

Through my personal experience, this can be a slightly confusing process at the beginning and it was quite frustrating when I tried to get nominated for exams. But I am truly amazed and excited about how much knowledge and understanding I built up in the end.

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