It was the skateboarders’ concerted effort and lobbying that raised the profile of wheeled sports within Glasgow, by demonstrating that Kelvingrove had once had a facility and which skateboarders, inline skaters and BMX riders once used and still gather there in numbers.

Through consultation with various groups of skateboarders, and a questionnaire to schools, libraries and the university, the features that the skate park would have were gathered together. The skaters designed and illustrated what they imagined it would look like and the Landscape Section drew these varied ideas together to formulate the final design. The design was put before the skaters at meetings and also publicised on skateboard websites.

The skate park has brought children, teenagers and adults together who have a passion for wheeled sports, which has allowed people from various parts of the City and beyond to meet, interact and make friendships. Skateboarding is a recognised sport, as is BMX, and it’s the taking part that is the real focus. The existence of a skatepark has not only brought new people to the sport but also has brought people back to it. Fathers who used to skate have brought their children along and helped them develop their own abilities and this can only be a benefit to all on a social and family level.

The park will help give children focus and an outlet, whilst striving to achieve that elusive trick or stunt. These are only some of the life and social skills that can develop in a sport that is so inclusive. It’s about hanging out, competing, helping others to develop skills and most of all having fun.


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